Cruising to Chile: Live Blog #5 (A Few Days in Peru)

We’re not sure exactly what we expected, but a desert to the ocean’s edge wasn’t it. Peru is a fascinating place…both geographically and culturally. After five days in Peru, we’ve come to appreciate the extent to which a cruise ship is, indeed, a great way to learn about a country new to us.

First, we’ve been taking in every port lecture available. Aboard this little ship, the Silver Muse, we are privileged to have on board a former journalist-turned-cruise-lecturer (who we’ll introduce in more detail when we move past live blogging to story-telling) who has been providing us with the history and culture of each place along the way before we land.

We spent several days touring Incan and pre-Incan ruins, and spent two terrific days in Lima. Our first introduction to this cosmopolitanism city was with a private tour guide we hired rough Tours-by-Locals, a Vancouver-based company we’ve used before. Aaron walked us through his city then took us home where his mother prepared lunch for us. What an incredible privilege to be welcomed with open arms into a Peruvian kitchen. This day was in contrast to our group tour the next day which took us outside the city, introducing us to Peruvian Paso horses.

Yesterday we toured the Tambor Colorado Incan city site which took us from ocean-front desert into the Pisco River valley with lunch at the San Jose hacienda. This is a privately-owned hacienda in the heart of the Peruvian black populace where descendants of the slaves who toiled at the hacienda in years gone by live and work. The music presentation was loud and headache-inducing, but the experience was interesting.

Today we’re at sea cruising to our last Peruvian experience. Tomorrow we head into the Andes to the city of Arequipa which is known as the “white city.” Looking forward to that, 7700 feet above sea level!

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Cruise Ports on Your Own: How We Do Nassau, Bahamas

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The straw market in Nassau isn’t what it used to be.

As the rain pelts down on us here in Toronto on a blustery early spring day we have wonderful memories of our most recent cruise through the Caribbean. First stop: Nassau in the Bahamas.

Not strictly speaking actually in the Caribbean (it’s actually in the Atlantic), Nassau is the capital of the Bahamas and isn’t actually an island. The island is New Providence, but no one ever seems to say they’re going to New Providence, rather they say they’re going to be in Nassau since the city does dominate. Nassau has long been a favorite winter vacation spot for Canadians although in recent years that has skewed more toward Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Cuba (yes, there are hundreds of actual resorts in Cuba contrary to the impression you might get from the American media recently) because of the price differential: The Bahamas is much more expensive, but it does make for a nice day ashore when cruising in.

Although it’s sometimes sensible to take a ship’s shore excursion – first-time visits to European ports come to mind – we try to avoid them when at all possible. The reasons will fill a future story, but for now just accept that discerning travelers prefer to be on their own or with a private guide! Avoiding the dreaded shore excursion means that we often like to self-direct our day ashore. Here’s how we did Nassau.

A familiar stop for us, Nassau is like an old friend and we knew exactly where we were headed when we left the ship that day. We do love the chance to walk a distance so we planned our route from the cruise terminal left along Bay Street toward one of the two bridges to paradise Island (one takes traffic in one direction the other takes it in the opposite, but you can walk in either direction on both). It’s about a 1.6 km (about a mile) walk to the bridge – takes about 20 minutes going through the part of downtown that has seen better days. We hadn’t been there for about four years and the recession seems to have taken hold.

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Atlantis, Paradise Island

We then headed up and over the bridge. That end of Paradise Island is dominated by the monstrously large Atlantis Resort complex. We spent a week there a number of years ago and if you haven’t ever been there before, it might just be worth taking an excursion that gives you access to their acres and acres of property, lagoons, beaches, impressive aquariums and the lot. We just walked over and back along the farther bridge that passes over the Potter’s Cay Fish Shacks and back to East Bay Street.

 

We retraced our steps and then went on past the cruise terminal along the part of Bay Street where the requisite duty-free shops and souvenirs are located. There is little about all of this that is Bahamian, but a visit to the storied Nassau Straw Market is designed to make you feel closer to the authentic Bahamas. Sadly, that is no longer true.

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Most of the ‘straw’ isn’t local!

Historically, the straw market showcased the traditional skills of plaiting, braiding and weaving of straw into myriad baskets, hats and other kitschy products. You used to even be able to watch the process. These days you’ll find more ‘straw’ hats from China, T-shirts and hordes of other trinkets from as equally far-flung places than traditional hand-crafted products. But if you look closely, you will find a Bahamian straw product or two. We didn’t spend much time there.

 

We walked along Bay Street as far as the British Colonial Hilton, a hotel where Art stayed too many years ago to even count now! Across the street there used to be a terrific spot for conch fritters, a must-try when visiting the Bahamas. Sadly, it, too had closed, and the space was forlorn and empty.

With that we made our way back to the ship to toast another warm and breezy Bahamian day.

 

If you have a few minutes, we invite you to come on that walk with us…